flowering status of plant (i)display only characters that require at least this flowering status
vegetative
flowering
fruiting
technical terminology (i)all characters are classified by the specialized knowledge required
lay persons (i)display only characters that do not require specialized knowledge
advanced (i)display also characters that require some sort of specialized knowledge
systematic botanists (i)display all characters
visibility of character (i)display only characters matching these criteria
easy to see
handlense required
preparations and/or binocular needed
morphological (i)choose the morphological characters you want to use to determine your plant
Habit (i)general appearance of a plant
Leaf (i)expanded, usually photosynthetic organ of a plant (including phylloclades)
Flower (i)reproductive portion of the plant, consisting of sepals, petals, stamens, and pistils
Inflorescence (i)flowering part of a plant, describes the arrangement of the flowers on the flowering axis
Fruit (i)the seed bearing organ, with or without adnate parts; a ripened ovary and any other structures which are attached and ripen with it. Aggregate fruits are handled like simple fruits for determination.
Hairs
Shoot/Stem (i)a young stem or branch
Root / shoot below ground (i)plant part below ground (in most cases), including below ground shoots, without leaves
systematic groups

Taxon Name (i)limit the result set to a certain systematic group: enter class, group, order, family, subfamily, tribe, genus, section or species name
Brassicaceae (i)special features within family


functional (i)choose functional characters you want to use to determine your plant
Distribution (i)region where the plant is likely to be found
Phenology (i)flowering and fruting period
Plant Use
Plant Status
The result list is possibly not yet complete as the database will be improved continually.
Your feedback is welcome.
Habit (i)general appearance of a plant
+ Growth form (i)Herb, shrub, tree or climber.
 
Special growth forms or habits character not available for digital key
 
+ Smell & Touch (i)General appearance of the plant.
 
+ Size of plant (i)Attention: use flowering or fruiting specimens to assess plant height (many biennial plants possess only a basal rosette in the first year).
 
+ Water or terrestrial plant (i)Where do the plants grow?
 
Leaf (i)expanded, usually photosynthetic organ of a plant (including phylloclades)
+ Leaf development (i)Structure and development of leaves.
 
+ Leaf arrangement (i)Arrangement of leaves at the stem.
 
+ Simple or divided leaves (i)Are the leaves simple or completely divided in several parts? Blade of the leaf entire or (more or less) deeply dissected. Attention: There are various appearances of the leaf margin (from entire to toothed and lobed). Here, we ignore this and ask only for dissections that separate the leaf for more than one third of its length or width, whatever is smaller. Sometimes, it is difficult to tell apart compound leaves from a shoot system with simple leaves: look for stipulae and/or axillary buds at the ground of the leaves: if only some possess these structures, the others are most likely leaflets of a compound leaf.
 
+ Shape of blade (i)Easy for simple leaves. In compound leaves use the general shape of leaflet. Always check the ground for largest leaves of a plant. To be worked out: how to handle pinnate leaves?
 
Length of leaves (i)How long is the leaf, be carefull in compound leaves, measure the complete leaf. character not available for digital key
 
Width of leaves (i)How broad is the leaf, be carefull in compound leaves, measure the complete leaf. character not available for digital key
 
+ Leaf apex (i)Appearance of the tip of leaf resp. leaflets in compound leaves.
 
+ Leaf margin (i)Structure of leaf margin (or that of a leaflet in case of compound leaves). Attention: Here we ask for the leaf margin, defined as all those dissections that separate the leaf for less than one third of its length or width, whatever is smaller. To be worked out: how to handle margin of pinnate leaves?
 
Leaf base (i)The angle the leaf blade forms with a real or imaginary (sessile leaves) petiole. Attention: Here, we consider only the base of leaves or leaflets (in case of compound leaves). character not available for digital key
 
+ Petiole (i)Leaf divided into stalk (petiole) and blade.
 
Leaf colour upper side (i)Shades of green on the leaf, upper side. character not available for digital key
 
Leaf colour lower side (i)Shades of green on the leaf, lower side. character not available for digital key
 
+ Leaf veination (i)Arrangement of the main veins of a leaf.
 
Flower (i)reproductive portion of the plant, consisting of sepals, petals, stamens, and pistils
+ Flower appearance and pollination (i)General appearance of the flower.
 
+ Flower colour (i)Attention: assess colour of the most colourful parts of the flower, but not of the stamens; be aware of single plants with a mutation (mostly white) on flower colour.
 
+ Perianth arrangement (i)Attention: in some plants, flowers may be dimorphic in different ways (dioecious or gynodioecious). If flowers vary, record the characters of the most showy flowers.
 
+ Diameter of flower (i)Diameter of flower or flower head.
 
+ Length of flower (i)For zygomorphic flowers only, instead of diameter of flower.
 
+ Flower symmetry (i)Symmetry of the perianth leaves. Attention: to assess this character, look on sepals, petals and stamens, but neglect carpels and ovary.
 
+ Flower form (i)common forms of flowers ? Veronica
 
+ Petal / Tepal number (i)Number of petal leaves (inner perianth leaves, usually coloured).
 
+ Spur (i)A hollow, slender, sac-like appendage of the perianth leaves, storing nectar.
 
+ Stamen number (i)Attention: We ask for the reproductive organs of the flower dispersing pollen. Count only fully fertile stamens, not staminodia (e.g. Parnassia).
 
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